Why do autistic kids like schedules?

Asked By: Fabiola Hand
Date created: Thu, Dec 17, 2020 11:44 PM
Best answers
It's well understood that kids and adults with ASD turn to routine, sameness, and even seemingly obsessive repetitive behaviors (as is the case in the most acute forms of autism), as a way to comfort themselves and to bring calm and self regulation to an otherwise anxious mind.
Answered By: Braeden Schimmel
Date created: Sat, Dec 19, 2020 1:47 AM

Organizing for autism - organize your home with an autistic child

Organizing for autism - organize your home with an autistic child
FAQ
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Helping your child with autism thrive tip 1: Provide structure and safety

  1. Be consistent…
  2. Stick to a schedule…
  3. Reward good behavior…
  4. Create a home safety zone…
  5. Look for nonverbal cues…
  6. Figure out the motivation behind the tantrum…
  7. Make time for fun…
  8. Pay attention to your child's sensory sensitivities.
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What to do during a very loud, very public meltdown

  1. Be empathetic. Empathy means listening and acknowledging their struggle without judgment…
  2. Make them feel safe and loved…
  3. Eliminate punishments…
  4. Focus on your child, not staring bystanders…
  5. Break out your sensory toolkit…
  6. Teach them coping strategies once they're calm.
🏥

Helping your child with autism thrive tip 1: Provide structure and safety

  • Be consistent…
  • Stick to a schedule…
  • Reward good behavior…
  • Create a home safety zone…
  • Look for nonverbal cues…
  • Figure out the motivation behind the tantrum…
  • Make time for fun…
  • Pay attention to your child's sensory sensitivities.
🏥

Here are our top seven strategies for promoting language development in nonverbal children and adolescents with autism:

  1. Encourage play and social interaction…
  2. Imitate your child
  3. Focus on nonverbal communication…
  4. Leave “space” for your child to talk
  5. Simplify your language…
  6. Follow your child's interests.
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About 1 in 54 children has been identified with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) according to estimates from CDC’s Autism and Developmental Disabilities Monitoring (ADDM) Network.
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Signs of autism in children

  • not responding to their name.
  • avoiding eye contact.
  • not smiling when you smile at them.
  • getting very upset if they do not like a certain taste, smell or sound.
  • repetitive movements, such as flapping their hands, flicking their fingers or rocking their body.
  • not talking as much as other children.
  • repeating the same phrases.
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What to do during a very loud, very public meltdown

  1. Be empathetic. Empathy means listening and acknowledging their struggle without judgment…
  2. Make them feel safe and loved…
  3. Eliminate punishments…
  4. Focus on your child, not staring bystanders…
  5. Break out your sensory toolkit…
  6. Teach them coping strategies once they're calm.

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A teen with autism tells you what it's really like
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